Dalmatian Dud- Postcards for the Lunch Bag


Looking for the ‘More Tangle Starts’ by Alice Hendon giveaway. Go to this post for details.

Artwork-Zebra Zensations Technical Pen and Daniel Smith watercolor on a Hahnemühle Rough Watercolor Postcard. Brushes: Jack Richeson Richeson Grey Matters Synthetic Watercolor Flat 1/4 Photo courtesy of skeeze on Pixabay.

Although the Dalmatian is considered a black and white dog by many, it does come with other colored spots. Only black and liver (brown) are accepted for show, but they also come in lemon, blue, brindle, or tricolor spots.

I really didn’t want to post this painting. It’s one of those where I fought with the paint from the moment I started.

This blank postcard lying under papers, for who knows how long, and thought ah! I’ll just use this. Even though the rough texture wasn’t really right for a smooth coated dalmatian. And the paint didn’t want to stick, so there was obviously something on the card. Eh. It got done, lol.

Tools

And Where You Can Buy Them

Hahnemühle Rough Watercolor Postcards (review)

Zebra Zensations Technical pens (review)

Daniel Smith watercolor:

Jack Richeson Richeson Grey Matters Synthetic Watercolor Flat 1/4

 

Go To Palette for animals


Some of you may have noticed that I’ve been playing with some new colors. I’ve found that I’ve been using the same Daniel Smith colors quite a bit when painting my daily postcards for the lunch bag.

But I wasn’t entirely happy with my choices. So I decided to try some other colors. A few I already had and just hadn’t used for a while. Some came from a new palette set I just bought (the Pacific Northwest set, curated by Molly Hashimoto and available at Art-Toolkit.com.

I don’t expect to keep all of these as my daily go-to colors, and I may add others.

Note the lack of reds. This isn’t the palette I’d use for flowers or birds. It’s pretty much meant to be the one I use for my animal paintings.

My chart looks a bit rough. That’s because I wanted it to show the colors as I would use them. I lifted color in areas, layered with glazes and did many of the things I’m not supposed to, lol.

In the past, I’ve mixed my browns, but having fallen in love with Piemontite Genuine, I decided to add Hematite Burnt Scarlet Genuine. It’s lighter and oh! It granulates so beautifully. What I’m finding is that it’s a lovely base color, especially allowed to blend into the Nickel Titanate Yellow, Naples Yellow or Monte Amiata. When I’m trying to get that ticked fur color, the granulation sort of does it naturally.

So here’s what I’m playing with at the moment.

Japanese Robin – Postcards for the Lunch Bag


Artwork-Zebra Zensations Technical Pen and Daniel Smith watercolor on a Hahnemühle Cold Press Watercolor Postcard. Brush: Rosemary & Co R12 Pocket Dagger Brush. Photo courtesy of Kaz on Pixabay.

Doodlewash Prompt: Songbird

Did you know that every continent has its own species of Robin?

Tools

And Where You Can Buy Them

Hahnemühle Cold Press Watercolor Postcards (review)

Zebra Zensations Technical pens (review)

Daniel Smith watercolor:

Rosemary & Co R12 Pocket Dagger Brush

 

Selkirk Rex – Postcards for the Lunch Bag


Artwork-Zebra Zensations Technical Pen and Daniel Smith watercolor on a Hahnemühle Rough Watercolor Postcard. Brushes: Jack Richeson Richeson Grey Matters Synthetic Watercolor Flat 1/4 Photo courtesy of athree23 on Pixabay.

Doodlewash Prompt: Lilac

In the world of cat shows, there is a pale grey color of fur that is called Lilac. I didn’t even try to be exact since I don’t have a real-life model, and have only seen the color once, years ago.

The model in my reference photo is a Selkirk Rex, a fairly recent breed noted for it’s long, curly hair.

Tools

And Where You Can Buy Them

Hahnemühle Cold Press Watercolor Postcards (review)

Zebra Zensations Technical pens (review)

Daniel Smith watercolor:

Jack Richeson Richeson Grey Matters Synthetic Watercolor Flat 1/4

 

 

White Tail Fawn – Postcards for the Lunch Bag


Artwork-Zebra Zensations Technical Pen and Daniel Smith watercolor on a Hahnemühle Cold Pressed Watercolor Postcard. Brushes: Jack Richeson Richeson Grey Matters Synthetic Watercolor Flat 1/4 Photo courtesy of skeeze on Pixabay.

Doodlewash prompt ‘Fawn’. Did you know that the average white tail fawn has between 294 to 306 spots. Do you ever wonder who does these counts? Is that a job career? Fawn spot counter. I could get into a job like that.

I’m playing with some new colors that I might add to my every day palette. I’ll discuss those more, next week.

Tools

And Where You Can Buy Them

Hahnemühle Cold Press Watercolor Postcards (review).

Zebra Zensations Technical pens (review)

Daniel Smith watercolor:

Jack Richeson Richeson Grey Matters Synthetic Watercolor Flat 1/4

 

Chipmunk vs Ground Squirrel- Postcards for the Lunch Bag


Artwork-Zebra Zensations Technical Pen and Daniel Smith watercolor on a Hahnemühle Cold Pressed Watercolor Postcard. Brushes: Jack Richeson Richeson Grey Matters Synthetic Watercolor Flat 1/4 Photo courtesy of LoggaWiggler on Pixabay.

Doodlewash prompt ‘Chipmunk’. Okay, I must confess. I painted a ground squirrel not a chipmunk. I couldn’t resist this guy’s cheeky but relaxed pose.

Though close in looks and habits, the ground squirrel doesn’t have head stripes and has shorter ears. They never climb and tend to avoid wooded areas. Most notably, they don’t store food even though they hibernate.

Tools

And Where You Can Buy Them

Hahnemühle Cold Press Watercolor Postcards (review).

Zebra Zensations Technical pens (review)

Daniel Smith watercolor:

Jack Richeson Richeson Grey Matters Synthetic Watercolor Flat 1/4

 

 

Purple & Bluing It


Artwork-Holbein and Winsor & Newton Gouache on a Stonehenge Aqua ColdPress Black watercolor paper. Brushes: Jack Richeson Richeson Grey Matters Synthetic Watercolor Flat 1/4 and Princeton Heritage Synthetic Sable 4050 Round 8 

There was a reference photo from Auciferz  that I had thought about using for either the Doodlewash sunflower or orchid prompt, but it didn’t seem quite right. Still I wanted to paint it.

The sunflower that I did paint for the prompt was an experiment using gouache on gouache. I learned what I wanted, but wasn’t totally satisfied with the finished piece.

So when I painted this I tried to think what was missing from the other flower and decided it was purples and blues. So I purpled and blued it!

What do you think?

Tools:

Stonehenge Aqua ColdPress Black watercolor paper

Wet Paint Custom Holbein Artist Gouache Set

Winsor & Newton Designers Gouache Brilliant Violet

Jack Richeson Richeson Grey Matters Synthetic Watercolor Flat 1/4

Princeton Heritage Synthetic Sable 4050 Round 8