Tutorial – How to Draw an Oyster Shell


I’m going to be visiting family who couldn’t make it to Mom’s funeral, so I’ll be still be missing off and on for a while. When I’m done with the traveling back and forth, the last Weekly Wednesday Giveaways will be launched. It includes a copy of Alice Hendon’s new ‘Tangle Around the World’!

For now:

Pencil to Paint Tutorial

Artwork-Zebra Pen Metallic Brush Pens, and Uniball Signo White Broad pen in a Hahnemühle black book.

Reference photo courtesy of EliasSch on Pixabay.

Postcards for the Lunchbag – Today my hubby took a pearl in his lunch bag. Did you know that oysters are both male and female at different times of their lifecycle?

Pencil

(This scan is darkened so you can see the pencil lines. You should pencil lines in lightly)

The Doodlewash prompt was seashell. I thought an oyster with a pearl would be more interesting to draw with my metallic brush pens so that’s where I went.

I roughed in my oyster in pencil (scan contrast punched up to show – you don’t want to draw this dark).

Not sure if you’re up to drawing this? Art Tutor has a great grid program that will help by applying a grid to your uploaded photo. You can also crop and adjust color and value.

Pen

I used purple, copper, gold and silver metallic brush pens to capture the various shades and shadows of the oyster, knowing that I was going to cover much of it with white. I smudge the pearl with my finger to give a shimmer around the outside and applied more color after.

I scribbled my lines in circular motions to get the pitted look of the shell, smudging in some places, to let a little bit of the color underneath show through. That doesn’t show up well in the scan though.

Gel pen ink can take a few minutes to dry completely through, so I let the card sit for about 1/2 an hour before continuing.

Ballpoint pen does a good job of coloring over gel pen. The bad part is that you can clog the ballpoint and ruin it. For that reason, I use whatever cheapo promotional pens I happen to have lying around.

This card took a bit longer than most of my black paper drawings. Partly because I waited for the gel ink to set and partly because I layered a bit more than usual. Still – maybe 25-30 minutes drawing time.

Tools

(and where you can buy them)

Hahnemühle Black book

White Uniball Signo Gel Pens

Zebra Pen Metallic Brush Pens

Preparing for Reviews & Tutorials


I have committed to several reviews and tutorials for July and August. Plus I have a couple of birthday presents to make and visiting family.

July is WORLD WATERCOLOR MONTH!!! There will be reviews, tutorials and giveaways galore at Doodlewash. com, the home of World Watercolor Month. Be sure to check it out as often as you can, ’cause it will be the happening place!

In order to keep myself from being committed from over-stimulation of the brain lobes, I decided to simplify my posting until I have all of these reviews and tutorials written and ready to go. Therefore, no Fun & Easy tutorial today or next week. I do have Tuesday Pencil to Paint tutorials scheduled up though.

It occurred to me, that some of you might like to see behind the scenes as it were. What do I do to prepare for a art tutorial or review?

As you can see from the artwork above, I’ve been doing preliminary sketches and throwing paint on paper to see what how it will flow and what textures I’ll get. This is the sort of thing I do.

I can’t wait to share my results with you!

Doodle Waiting


Artwork: Zebra Pen Mildliner brush pens on Hahnemühle YouTangle Tiles

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I’ve had to do a lot of waiting the last couple of weeks, for various reasons. Zebra Pens US sent me a boatload of new pens – Sarasa clip pens and Mildliners. I grabbed some of the mildliners (check out the weekly giveaway!) and stuffed them in my purse (which weighs a ton! ouch!) along with some Hahnemühle YouTangle tiles.

And instead of just waiting, I doodle waited!

Mostly I was trying out the pens and checking out the new colors, but I also kept the Doodlewash prompts for the month in mind. Abstract. It’s a wonderful word that means ‘this almost looks like something’, lol.

Doodlewash prompt: Tomatoes. I started trees before I thought of tomatoes and hadn’t pulled out any reds. Ah well, tamrillos are kind of purplish and they’re called tree tomatoes.

Doodlewash prompt: Sand. At first, I just thought about doing dots in all the different colors, but I didn’t think I’d have time. Then I had the idea of confetti blowing around in a sandstorm and combined the two.

Doodlewash prompt: Under Water. So this one has under water and over water. Close enough.

Doodlewash prompt: Wildflowers. Okay, this one is really a stretch, lol. It looks more like a piñata , but a piñata made of wild flowers. Right? Right?

Wanna buy some of these cool toys now?

Hahnemühle YouTangle Tiles (review).

Zebra Pen Mildliner Pens

Hippo Bathing – Postcards for the Lunch Bag


Artwork-Zebra Zensations Technical Pen and Daniel Smith watercolor on a Hahnemühle Cold Pressed Watercolor Postcard. Brushes: Princeton Neptune Quill size 4 and Velvetouch Round Size 8. Photo courtesy of scholty1970 at Pixabay.

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Today, my hubby took a hippo in his lunchbag. Did you know that the hippopotamus doesn’t have sweat glands? But they excrete a pink fluid that acts as a natural sun block.

Doodlewash Prompt #Ice. You’d feel a shiver of ice down your spine if you saw this guy popping up next to your boat!

Tools

(and where you can buy them)

Hahnemühle Cold Press Watercolor Postcards (you can find my review here).

Zensations Technical pens

DANIEL SMITH 15ml watercolor

Princeton Artist Brush Neptune, Brushes for Watercolor Series 4750, Quill Synthetic Squirrel, Size 4

Tutorial – How to Paint a Klipspringer Antelope


Pencil to Paint Tutorial

Artwork-Zebra Zensations Technical Pen and Daniel Smith watercolor on a Hahnemühle Cold Pressed Watercolor Postcard. Brushes: Princeton Neptune Quill Size 4 & Neptune Round Size 8.

This painting is what is known as a ‘line and wash’ because it is drawn in pen first and then painted with watercolor.

Reference photo courtesy of JakeWilliamHeckey on Pixabay.

Postcards for the Lunchbag – Today, my hubby took a Klipspringer in his lunchbag. Did you know that this teeny tiny antelope walks on tip-toe due to their downward pointing hooves, which make them excellent climbers? The Doodlewash prompt for today is Sandals – it’s a stretch but I’m claiming that specialized feet equal sandals, lol.

Klipspringers are noted for their plush fur, and my main goal was to capture the texture and ticking of the fur. Ticking occurs when there are two or three bands of color on each hair. It’s tricky to paint.

Pencil

(This scan is darkened so you can see the pencil lines. You should pencil lines in lightly)

The shapes for this Klipspringer are pretty simple so I penciled them in freehand, without using a grid. I see that I missed one of his horns, lol. These pencil drawings are only a guide and you should always feel free to change your mind once you start the penwork.

Not sure if you’re up to drawing this? Art Tutor has a great grid program that will help by applying a grid to your uploaded photo. You can also crop and adjust color and value.

Masking Fluid

As I mentioned above, the Klipspringer has ticking. It appeared to me that in some areas the fur was black, white and buff, while in other areas it was black, white and sienna or ochre.

Before starting my pen drawing, I used a Pebeo Masking Fluid pen to create hair-like markings all over the antelope. I do this before the pen work because it will break up some of the pen lines creating even more ticking.

It’s also easier to add more pen lines after the masking fluid is removed. You can’t add more white as easily.

I also covered the eyelashes, and small patches of white fur around the eye, chin, throat, ears and part of the horns.

Pen

Normally, I draw the outline of the animal in pen, but I wanted to wait until I saw my ticked effect to do so, this time.

I filled in around the eye, the dark areas of the ears and horns, the nose and that strange little patch down from the eye. Looks like an extra eye, doesn’t it?

I don’t color these in solid because I want some color from the paint to show.

Next, I draw ticking where the klipspringer appears to have black in the hair. Note how in many areas I’m drawing narrow ovals. Almost like seeds instead than hairs.

This will add yet more complexity to the ticking effect once the masking fluid is removed.

Paint

Using my quill brush loaded with water, I pick up a little bit of lavender, and lay down the shadowed area.

A quill brush has what is known as a wide ‘belly’, the middle of the brush, and then it narrows at the tip. A good quill soaks up the water and paint, and holds it in the belly.

With a quill, I don’t bother putting water on the paper first, or mixing water into the paint, because there is so much water in the brush.

Meanwhile, you can draw tiny, narrow lines with the tip of the brush, or sweep along the side of the brush for broad lines. The paint/water in the brush is released in an even flow. You can paint almost forever without having to reload your brush. It’s a delight to work with one.

The drawbacks (and there are ALWAYS drawbacks) are:

  • difficulty getting dark colors because of all the water
  • picking up paint when adding more color, and ending up with lighter instead of darker color

A bad quill brush will almost immediately go flat with the slightest pressure and will release bunches of water giving you a flood.

If you don’t have a good quill, you can get the same sort of paint flow with a soft bristle round brush that will hold it’s shape. But you will have to mix your paint with water on the palette and will have to go back more often to pick up color.

After cleaning the quill I, squeeze a little water from it, and pick up some Monte Amiata Natural Sienna (called Monte Amiata after this) and color the yellowish areas.

I like this color, but my scanner doesn’t show it to advantage. It’s a granulating color – good for that ticking because it gets a pebbly effect, and that’s what I want.

Switching to a soft bristled, round size 8, I paint the throat and chest with buff titanium.

Once all the paint has thoroughly dried, I remove the masking fluid.

The white streaks are too harsh – they always are. I kind of like it this time and I’m almost tempted to leave it this way. I don’t though.

Using the quill with lots of water, I barely touch the tip into Phthalo Blue. This is an intense staining color that is hard to lighten, so I only want the tiniest, wateriest mix I can get. I use it on the nose and around the eyes, ears and horns.

Switching to a soft bristled, round size 8, I pick up some of the Monte Amiata and add it around the outside of the same area I used it before to darken the values.

I add some lavender hair in the area of the chest and throat to imply light shading among the fur.

Once it all dries, I use the damp round brush and very lightly sweep it in short strokes across the ticked areas to blend the areas left white by the masking fluid.

Finishing Touch

Again, I let it dry. Then I add more pen work, finishing the outline, darkening between the eyelashes, and adding more ticking on the face.

I could have blended the white hairs more thoroughly to get closer to my original intention. I like what happened in that area though, and decided to leave. I can always go back later if I wish, and change the effect.

Tools

(and where you can buy them)

Hahnemühle Cold Press Watercolor Postcards (you can find my review here).

Zensations Technical pens

Pebeo Drawing Gum High Precision Masking Fluid Marker Pen

DANIEL SMITH Extra Fine Watercolor 15ml Paint Tubes; 

Princeton Artist Brush Neptune, Brushes for Watercolor Series 4750, Quill Synthetic Squirrel, Size 4

Axolotl – Postcards for the Lunch Bag


Artwork-Daniel Smith watercolor on a Hahnemühle Cold Pressed Watercolor Postcard. Brushes: Princeton Neptune Quill size 4 and Velvetouch Round Size 8. Photo courtesy of uthlas on Pixabay.

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Postcards for the Lunch Bag

Today, my hubby took an axolotl in his lunchbag. Also known as the Mexican Walking Fish, they are an amphibian like no other. In the wild, they are only found in Lake Xochimilco, located in Mexico City.

Doodlewash Prompt: Waterfall. The Axolotl is endangered because so much of Lake Xochimilco, and the other four lakes in the valley of Mexico, have been drained to prevent flooding. Waterfall, indeed.

Where can you get the cool toys I used?

Hahnemühle Cold Press Watercolor Postcards (you can find my review here).

Daniel Smith Watercolor Half Pan Set of 15 Ultimate Mixing Set  ( review )

Princeton Velvetouch Series 3950 Synthetic (review)

 

 

Veggie Plate Abstract


Artwork: Zebra Pen Metallic & Mildliner brush pens on Hahnemühle YouTangle Tile

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Doodlewash prompt: Vegetables. I thought this looked a bit like what’s left on the plate after you’ve moved the yucky veggies around in an attempt to make it look like you eaten some of it.

Another of the YouTangle tiles that I did when I got my set of Zebra Pen Mildliner brush pens. I love using this combination of Mildliner and Metallic brushpens on YouTangle tiles.

The YouTangle paper is similar to a Bristol. Smooth without being slick, so pen just glides across the page, but the ink stays on the surface long enough to stay bright and intense.

Wanna buy some of these cool toys now?

Hahnemühle YouTangle Tiles (review).

Zebra Pen Metallic Brush Pens

Zebra Pen Mildliner Pens

The Green in a Grolier: a mini-Review


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No one makes more beautiful sketchbooks than Paperblanks. The book I’m reviewing here is actually the Guest book version of their Grolier Ornamentali.

But it is the blank page version, the paper is smooth, high-quality and did I mention, the book is … just … gorgeous?

It’s so gorgeous, that I wanted to bring it to your attention, but I don’t plan to do my usual ‘destruction’ testing. As a guest book, the paper is formulated for people to write in with pen. I only intend to use it for pen and colored pencil. I don’t want to do anything to remove from the beauty of the book itself.

So, what is so beautiful about this book? Well, you’ve already seen the gorgeous Grolier Ornamentali cover, which the Paperblanks blurb describes as “marbled binding, enhanced with a thin sprinkling of gold dust and tooling “.

It also has Smythe-sewn binding, and a ridged spine.

But what I’ve been drooling over most is the book-edge printing!

I’ll admit, I’m only so-so about the clasp. It’s nicely made, but can get in the way when you’re drawing.

Specs:

Series: Grolier Ornamentali
Hardcover: 144 pages
Paper wgt: 120 gsm
Smyth sewn
Satin ribbon marker (grandes have two)
Memento pouch
Custom-designed laid paper
100% recycled binder boards
FSC-certified text paper
Cloth headboards
Threaded stitching and glue, as needed
Acid-free sustainable forest paper
Decorative printed cover paper

The Grolier Ornamentali is also available in Grande, Ultra, Midi and Mini size Journals.

So what about the paper?

The paper is thin, but sturdy with a surface that pulls the ink off your pen very nicely.

There is enough tooth to make it work well for colored pencil, though I don’t think it would hold up to a great number of layers or heavy burnishing.

Nonetheless, it is a pleasure to work in!

The Ornamentali was based off of a Jean Grolier design.

Lightning


Artwork-Miya Himi Gouache and Art Philosophy Metallic Watercolor on Stonehenge Aqua ColdPress Black

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Doodlewash prompt: Lightning. Did you know that helicopters can cause a lightning strike? If the helicopter builds up a negative charge, and flies someplace that is positively charged, you get lightning.

One more reason to avoid helicopter rides, lol!

Dalmation


Artwork-Zebra Pen Metallic Brush Pen in Hahnemühle black book

Are you looking for:

Today, my hubby took a Dalmation in his lunchbag.

Doodlewash prompt: Barefoot. Hey! I’m right on with this prompt. It isn’t often that you see a dalmation wearing booties!

Wanna buy some of these cool toys now?

Tools

(and where you can buy them)

Hahnemühle Black book

White Uniball Signo Gel Pens

Zebra Pen Metallic Brush Pens