Tutorial – How to Draw an Oyster Shell


I’m going to be visiting family who couldn’t make it to Mom’s funeral, so I’ll be still be missing off and on for a while. When I’m done with the traveling back and forth, the last Weekly Wednesday Giveaways will be launched. It includes a copy of Alice Hendon’s new ‘Tangle Around the World’!

For now:

Pencil to Paint Tutorial

Artwork-Zebra Pen Metallic Brush Pens, and Uniball Signo White Broad pen in a Hahnemühle black book.

Reference photo courtesy of EliasSch on Pixabay.

Postcards for the Lunchbag – Today my hubby took a pearl in his lunch bag. Did you know that oysters are both male and female at different times of their lifecycle?

Pencil

(This scan is darkened so you can see the pencil lines. You should pencil lines in lightly)

The Doodlewash prompt was seashell. I thought an oyster with a pearl would be more interesting to draw with my metallic brush pens so that’s where I went.

I roughed in my oyster in pencil (scan contrast punched up to show – you don’t want to draw this dark).

Not sure if you’re up to drawing this? Art Tutor has a great grid program that will help by applying a grid to your uploaded photo. You can also crop and adjust color and value.

Pen

I used purple, copper, gold and silver metallic brush pens to capture the various shades and shadows of the oyster, knowing that I was going to cover much of it with white. I smudge the pearl with my finger to give a shimmer around the outside and applied more color after.

I scribbled my lines in circular motions to get the pitted look of the shell, smudging in some places, to let a little bit of the color underneath show through. That doesn’t show up well in the scan though.

Gel pen ink can take a few minutes to dry completely through, so I let the card sit for about 1/2 an hour before continuing.

Ballpoint pen does a good job of coloring over gel pen. The bad part is that you can clog the ballpoint and ruin it. For that reason, I use whatever cheapo promotional pens I happen to have lying around.

This card took a bit longer than most of my black paper drawings. Partly because I waited for the gel ink to set and partly because I layered a bit more than usual. Still – maybe 25-30 minutes drawing time.

Tools

(and where you can buy them)

Hahnemühle Black book

White Uniball Signo Gel Pens

Zebra Pen Metallic Brush Pens

Tutorial – How to Draw a Zebra on Black Paper


Pencil to Paint Tutorial

Artwork-Uniball Signo White Broad pen and Zebra Pen Sarasa Metallic Clip Pens in Hahnemühle black book

I don’t have any black-paper postcards, but I’ve been cutting some out of my Hahnemühle Black Book. I hate to do that, but drawing on black is so quick and I love the paper so much. When time gets critical I grab the scissors and start cutting! Maybe I’ll be lucky and Hahnemühle will start making black paper postcards. One can hope.

Pencil

(This scan is darkened so you can see the pencil lines. You should pencil lines in lightly)

Even though the paper is black, pencil shows up well enough. I just drew the overall shape and facial detail.

I didn’t pencil in the stripes, because I find that without a contrast of color the lines are just confusing. I suspect this differs for people, so try it one way, and if it doesn’t work, try it the other next time.

When you do start working on the stripes – either drawing or coloring them in – it helps if you have one hand over your reference, and run a finger along the stripe you are drawing. That helps you see where you are, and helps the brain to hand communication.

Not sure if you’re up to drawing this? Art Tutor has a great grid program that will help by applying a grid to your uploaded photo. You can also crop and adjust color and value.

Pen

I used a Uniball Signo White pen to draw the stripes.

My pencil lines are only a guide. It may not show up on your screen, but I changed the shape of the mane, so there are pencil marks left. Sometimes I erase marks like these, and sometimes I don’t.

I used purple and blue gel pens for shading.

This was my first time using the Sarasa Clip Metallic pens. In essence, they are metallic gel pens. I prefer the Metallic brush pens because of the flow and larger nib size. But some times you want a smaller size, and a rougher looking coverage.

This took about 10 minutes from start to finish!

Tools

(and where you can buy them)

Hahnemühle Black book

White Uniball Signo Gel Pens

Zebra Sarasa Clip 1.0, 9 Shiny / Metallic Color Set 

Tutorial – How to Draw a Grove of Trees


Artwork: Daniel Smith Watercolor on Stonehenge Aqua Coldpress Black

Are you here for:

This is a repeat of the Grove step-out. I’ve updated the text and added a new header example. Sorry – I didn’t have time for a video this week.

One of the hallmarks of ‘naive art’ (I recommend you google Naive Art Landscapes) is that real-life perspective is not important. If your buildings are a little crooked and the road in the distance looks as wide as the road up front – it just adds to the charm.

Grove is a forest of trees. It can be used as the main subject of a landscape, but is also great as a secondary subject in the midground or background.

Your grove can look like several trees or a tree with several trunks that split from the same base.

If Grove is your main subject, you add more detail. If it is background, you want to keep it more simple.

This drawing done with Zebra Sarasa Fineliners on Hahnemühle Watercolor Postcard

Wanna buy some of the cool toys I use?

Hahnemühle Rough Watercolor Postcards (review).

Hahnemühle Hand Lettering Pad  (review)

Stonehenge Aqua ColdPress Black watercolor paper (review)

Zebra Zensations Technical pens (review)

Zebra Zensations Fineliner Pen 0.8mm Assorted 24Pk

Daniel Smith Watercolor Half Pan Set of 15 Ultimate Mixing Set  ( review )

Full list of Fun & Easy Step-outs

Want to share your Fun & Landscapes?  Join the Fun & Easy Landscape Facebook Group!

Three Roads Fun & Easy Tutorial


This is a revised version of one of my previous Fun & Easy Landscape posts.
Instead of step-outs, today I’m showing you some composition tips.  The composition is the layout of your work, how it all fits together, no matter what the subject of your landscape.
Hints for an Fun & Easy landscape.  Keep it simple.  Have contrast – at least 3 values: light, midtone and darks.  Have something that ties it together and leads you through the drawing/painting.  In this case, a road.
I almost didn’t share this video.  I’ve never used gouache before, and struggled with this painting.   But I thought, I’m always telling people to judge their work for what is good about it, not what is bad.  I should take my own advice so people know that I mean it.

Three Road Compositions

I’ve come up with three kinds of road compositions that will tie a painting together, make it seem whole, and help lead the eye through the drawing/painting.  Note that you could also use fences, rivers, walls … anything that creates a ribbon/border through-out a painting.
Winding Roads
Winding Roads gently curve over slopes, emphasizing the height, width and distance of each section.
To increase the feel of the distance, the road is wider at the beginning (the bottom) of each slope and narrows toward the top.  The road in each subsequent slope is narrower than the slope before it.
Wrap Around Roads
The Wrap Around Road also winds around but not gently. It twists and curls like a snake, wrapping around various objects.  It disappears at times, when it wraps behind something.
If you want to imply distance, the road should be wider at the start (the bottom) and be slightly narrower each time it reappears from behind an object.  However, this kind of road is also often used in landscapes where there is no sense of distance or depth.  If the road is a lane or foot-worn track, it may widen and narrow at random, as it does here.
Striped Roads

Striped roads can be straight or slightly curved.  They carve your drawing into sections, that you fill with trees, flowers, rocks and animals. This is a good roadway to use if you like to create rows of objects.

If you want to imply distance you make each road narrower as you go up the page.  Items within each section become smaller to show they are further away.  But if you wish, you can ignore distance altogether.

Slight curved and diagonal to one another.

Straight and parallel to one another.

These are the three roads in my fantasy landscapes? What other kinds of roads might you have in yours?  Please share your thoughts!

Fun & Easy Landscape Facebook Group  

All Fun & Easy Landscape Step-outs

My supplies:

Hahnemühle Black book – Rochester Art Supply FineArtStore

Miya Hima 18-Color Gouache Set

Black Gold® Series 206D DAGGER – Size 1/2

The Last Saturday Links to Tangles, Tutorials and Giveaways


If you are looking for the Life Imitates Doodles Weekly Wednesday Giveaway #16 , you can find it here.

I started posting links to tangles, tutorials and giveaways back in January of 2010. I was doing it daily at that time. I’ve been down to one day a week for a while, and it’s still taking me hours every week. WordPress is flaky, making it more difficult to put the list together. Many of my reliable sources are no longer posting. Meanwhile, fewer and fewer people are stopping to look at the list.

You probably know where this is going. Although, I’ve very much enjoyed searching out all these wonderful links, there are other things I’d like to do with the time.

Today’s link list is my last.

I hope you will still come to visit and enjoy my art, reviews and tutorials. With the time I’ll be saving I plan to start up my Fun & Easy Landscape and Animal step-outs again and those will be posted on Saturday mornings. On Tuesdays, I’m posting a ‘Pencil to Paint’ mini-tutorial and Wednesdays, of course, I have the Weekly Wednesday Giveaways.

Artwork-A Study in Scarlet-Arteza Watercolor Brush Pen on Hahnemühle Cézanne cold-press.

Zentangle

Challenges

Pattern Videos & Instructions

New Patterns

Strings

Other

***

Tutorials

***

Giveaways

***

Doodlewash

***

Reviews

Baby Blues – Pencil to Paint


If you are looking for the Life Imitates Doodles Weekly Wednesday Giveaway #16 , you can find it here.

Doodlewash prompt ‘Baby Blues’.

Pencil to Paint is a bit misleading for today’s mini-tutorial because I didn’t use either pencil or paint, lol.

Using tea or coffee to stain your paper is well-known technique for achieving gorgeous golden browns but now we have butterfly pea flower tea, which turns a beautiful blue.

I decided to see what kind of effect I could get from this tea. A little research showed that it is used as a natural food and clothing dye, so I thought it should be great for paper, too.

Once my tea had steeped for about 8 minutes (going from a clear light blue to midnight blue) I put the wet flowers onto my paper and pushed it around with a cheap brush. Gotta say – I love the color!

I kept squeezing the flowers to release more tea, and I discovered that I achieved a lovely indigo color. However, I found that in some lights it looks almost violet.

Is there a drawback to using this tea? Um. Yeah. Remember I said it was used for a clothing dye? Well, the color bleed right through the paper and onto the photo backdrop I use for my videos. Waaaah! I haven’t been able to get it out. So don’t wear your party clothes or use it around your good furniture! That probably goes for drinking it too, if you are the klutz I am.

I decided to try the tea on a more absorbent paper. The flowers from the tea were still wet (hours later!) and still had lots of color, so I used the same flowers on IndigoArts Hot Pressed mixed media paper.

I saw what looked like an eye, and immediately saw the drawing for today’s prompt.

THUNDERBIRD HATCHES!!!!

Isn’t he the cutest little baby? Not! Thunderbird is serious business right out of the egg!

Artwork-Blue Tea and Zebra PM-701 on IndigoArts Hot Pressed Watercolor paper

On the Cézanne piece, where I’d left the pea flowers on for much longer, there were all sorts of shapes from the outline of the flowers. I’ve been working in Charlie O’Shields Sketching Stuff Activity book, and I decided that I’d use the outline shapes and just draw separate little images (lots of birds in there!). It’s rather busy, but was great fun. I may or may not paint over this are some point and create something else entirely.

Artwork-Blue Tea and Zebra Pen Technical Pen on Hahnemühle Cézanne Cold Pressed Watercolor paper

Wanna buy some of these cool toys now?

Hahnemühle Cézanne Watercolor Blocks   (Review)

Indigo Art Mixed Media paper

Zebra PM-701 Stainless Steel Permanent Marker

Dried butterfly pea flower tea

Saturday Links to Tangles, Tutorials and Giveaways


If you are looking for the Life Imitates Doodles Weekly Wednesday Giveaway #15 , you can find it here.

Artwork: Red-Handed Zebra Metallic Brush pen in a Hahnemühle Black Book

Zentangle

Challenges

Pattern Videos & Instructions

New Patterns

Strings

Other

***

Tutorials

***

Giveaways

***

Doodlewash

***

Reviews