Meta post on naming tangle patterns at Beez in the Belfrey


Sandra Bartholomew has written an interesting post on the reasons for funky tangle names. Well worth reading if you’ve ever wondered why they chose they chose that name for that pattern.

Inspiration Pays a Visit

My tangle patterns:Jester


In times past, the Jester was the Fool that reminded the King he was human.  He’d entertain and play tricks to amuse.

The Jester pattern creates an optical illusion to fool the mind. Adding it to your zentangle will amuse and entertain both yourself and viewers.

Here is a work in progress showing the JESTER pattern.

My tangle patterns:Appaloosa


The wildly spotted coat of the Appaloosa conjures up visions of rugged landscapes, the wild west, war parties. 
This striking pattern will add a bold splash of excitement to your zentangle.
Spread the blanket where-ever you want–top, bottom, on the sides.   Go wild with the spots.  Tiny dots, wild splotches. No appaloosa is ever the same!

Zentangle using Wood-sere, Charm, Elegance and Flair


The Illustrated Story of Cosmic Puppy’s search for the Bountiless Bone Pages 16-18. Other pages can be found at my FLICKR site.
I’m working in a 3.5 x 5.5 Moleskine Japanese style album with concertina style paper. When done, the zentanglewill be about 8 feet long!

My tangle patterns:Charm, Elegance & Flair


Simple structures often serve as the cornerstone of more ornate buildings.  Charm is simple, and a sweet little tangle in its own right.  But it can also serve as the base for Elegance and Flair.  One can only imagine how many variations could be created!

New tangle and sale at Beez in the Belfrey


Sandra Bartholomew has posted a new tangle, ‘Squid’, at Beez in the Belfrey.  It’s so-o-o cool!

There is also a 50% sale on her 100 pack tangle-trading cards.  They are cards with boxes for drawing your own tangle patterns.  I’m not sure how long the sale lasts and I had a little difficulty getting the code to work correctly so make sure the price reflects the sales price, when you order.

My tangle patterns:Wood-sere


Dead leaves dancing in the wind. Snowflakes glittering in the moonlight. Trees silhoutted against a frosty sky.  Winter is a time of magic. 

Three is somewhat of a magic number in composition, the layout of an artistic piece, so I decided to use that to create a tree-like tangle. 

Each tree has three branches.  Each branch has three limbs.  Each limb has three shoots of its own.  Vary the length and direction, making sure you don’t automatically make all the limbs increasingly smaller as you add limb to limb.

Wood-sere is more realistic than most tangle patterns.  It gives a stark, dramatic flair to your zentangle or zendoodle.  But if you wish a more abstract look, make your branches and limbs straighter. Bend your branches and limbs in square 90 degree angles.

Lacy: Non-official Zentangle/ZIA pattern


We’ve long sought to replicate the beautiful patterns of nature.
Throughout the ages, lacemakers have decorated clothing and beautified tabletops and fancied up their furniture with fluffy, delicate, or elegant streams of lace.

You can enhance your zentangles with a touch of LACY. This particular pattern makes me think of my Grandma’s parlor.

For a look at fantastic laces and fabrics, visit  Geology Urban Fossil’s FLICKR photostream.
 She finds old fabrics, and recreates them into modern treasures.

Stubs: Non-official Zentangle/ZIA tangle pattern


Tangle patterns are everywhere, even in the art of others.

Jennifer Maestre is one artist that thinks outside the box–or rather, outside the drawing. Instead of using her pencils to sketch with, she cuts them up, and sews them into the most incredible creatures.

http://www.jennifermaestre.com/

The minute I saw her work, I realized there was a tangle there, and STUBS was born.

It’s a tangle with energy that will add pizzazz to your zentangle.

Buoy: Non-official Zentangle/ZIA pattern



Buoy
Originally uploaded by molossus aka rooibas

Sometimes you need a little help.

Buoy is a simple little doodle that adds zing to repetitive backgrounds such as pebbles, or KEEKO or YINCUT. It’s a handy dandy lifesaver shape.

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