Bleedthrumanade with Eels and Bedrock & Review of Whitelines Notebook


A couple of weeks ago, I posted about the free paper samples (temporarily not available) I received from Bureau Direct.  One of those papers was from a Whitelines Notebook. I was intrigued with the sample, and immediately ordered an A5 size from them.

I couldn’t tell for sure but the cover appears to be a coated cardboard, but it’s very sturdy without being heavy. The binding is glued (Whitelines calls the style Perfect Bound), and it does not lie flat, which is the only real flaw I found.  I found the Orange and White design appealing, and I like the feel of the notebook in hand.

The paper is a light gray with white grid lines (you can also get a lined version).  There is less glare, and the lines don’t interfere with your writing or drawing as much as the traditional dark lines do.  The blurbs say that the lines don’t photocopy, but they do pick up on my scanner.  This white on gray is supposed to be helpful for people with dyslexia, and the paper itself is Swedish totally Carbon Free Paper.­ (which means no Carbon Dioxide­ from fossil fuels is being emitted during production).

I did a bleedthrumanade (Got lemons, make lemonade.  Got marker bleedthru, make bleedthrumanade) with my Letraset Promarkers and a Kuretake Disposable brush pen.  I decided to only color half the page, to get a feel for how the white on gray did with both Black & White and Color.

The scan is true–in some areas, the white lines almost disappear to the naked eye.  Surprisingly, they disappear most where the patterns are busiest.  I think the brain can’t deal and just evens the white and gray to one shade.  Promarkers are very translucent colors so I wasn’t surprised that the white lines show but again, the brain tends to ignore them.  If I don’t look closely and specifically for the white lines, I don’t notice them.  The colors themselves didn’t seem to change because of the gray, but I don’t think they were as bright as usual.

This would be a great book for organizing or practicing your tangles.  You would need to work on a surface so that you can hold the book open, because of the binding. I like the the white on gray for the novelty of it, but the more I look at it, the more I like it because it’s easy on the eyes.

Emerging from Bedrock-Front

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