Mis?adventures in Watercolor: Lessons Learned


So.  I haven’t been posting much artwork lately.  I was in a funk, artwise, between weather-change, and sinus infection,and all the dreary stuff we Oregonians put up with this time of the year.  I decided to back off a bit and let myself regenerate.  Sometimes you just have to simmer tell the flavor is at its peak, lol!  I think it has helped and I’ve been busy this weekend.

I did two watercolors.  It’s been fun having the Daniel Smith try-it dots.  I can pick up my watercolor books and choose a project, and have all the colors necessary!  No trying to decide what other color might work.  I’m still using the original 66 try-it dot page, but I had to get into the 238 try-it dots for a couple of colors.

The lessons I learned from these two works?  The cat is an adaptation from a project in Grant Fuller’s Watercolor A to Z workbook).  I decided to use Grant’s color choices, but use a different photo reference.  My photo didn’t show the whole cat, and I had trouble imagining what wasn’t there.  As a result, my cat is a bit off–two styles that don’t quite mesh.  Almost.  Lesson learned?  Either use my imagination or use a reference, unless I know the subject really, really well.

The flowers came from a project in Robin Berry’s How to Paint Watercolor Flowers.  I’m starting to get the hang of color-mixing and when the project called for Sap Green, I wondered if I was going to get mud.  I did.  Sap Green is one of those colors that differs greatly from manufacturer to manufacturer.  Mine seemed too yellow to go with the purple madder and scarlet lake, and it was.  I was using it in a background, where Robin had none.  So my lesson learned–when following someone else’s project, sometimes I need to listen to the author, and sometimes I need to use my own good sense.  But most of all, I still need to learn which and when, lol!  A life lesson we all struggle with!

2 comments

  1. These are really nice. I just ordered that one book about negative painting that you mentioned in one of your posts.

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